Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN2 9
CSPAN 8
KCSM (PBS) 2
MSNBCW 2
CNBC 1
CNNW 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it under control. we know that this is part of the arab spring. we know that change is coming. but as i think you
now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the a
. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
for syria. china cannot recently with a four-point plan. did you take this seriously? if so, could this be part of the new normal, china looking at a crisis the west is unable to solve far from its shores and saying, we have a position to take and could play a role on this? >> on to the back row. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> early in the discussion, you had asked about the dispute for the islands. your response was the chinese response was part of a long-term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build an infrastructure to gain access of raw materials. at the same time, we have also seen them a tremendous efforts to build military to military relations. my question for the panel is, is that military dimension just an effort to protect economic interests or is it some part of a long-term plan to help lay the foundations for their assent to the position as a global power? >> one last gentleman and what neil diamond would call the tree people, hot august night. this gentleman. run the microphone to
and syria. the whole house will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikein response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also lled. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their militaryesponse and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international su
. >> and seeking clarity -- german chancellor angel merkel on how to develop renewable energy. we begin in syria where the military is currently stepping up its use of airpower in an effort to defeat the rebels. >> opposition forces say at least 70 people have been killed in an air strike near the turkish border. meanwhile, a video emerges of what appears to be opposition fighters executing government soldiers. >> the un says that if the video is authenticated, the action would constitute a war crime. >> as their prisoners cower in terror, rebels celebrate. this video is said to of been recorded in northwestern syria. government forces and rebels have been fighting there for weeks. on thursday, rebels stormed several army checkpoints. they appear to have captured these government soldiers. in the video, rebels yell, "you are assad's dogs" at their captives, and then they prayed. after that, they fired round after round, killing at least 10 of those prisoners. the united nations is trying to verify the video and says the killings probably constituted a war crime and those responsible should be pu
in a piece in the wall street gorm, that they are coming back everywhere in iraq, in afghanistan, in syria. they're all over the place. so it interferes with the president's narrative. we got bin laden, al qaeda's on the run, therefore, i am a great command in chief. the fact is everything's unraveling in the missed east. >> greta: straight ahead, not just senator mccain, tonight, senator lindy graham firing back. we are here to talk about the heated battle, next. and the real war on women. some women say they are censored by facebook. who are they? allen west, fighting a tough election battle. hew he just got big-name backup. where others fail, droid powers through. introducing the new droid razr maxx hd by motorola. now more than ever droid does. >> senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. i'm happy to have that discussion with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambass do, who had nothing to do with benghazi? and was simply making a presentation based on intel jeps that she had received? and to besmirch her reputation? is outra
uncertainty with egypt, uncertainty on its border with jordan, civil war in syria, probl problems with hezbollah and lebanon. not to mention iran. there's no port in the storm. this is now the new middle east. >> and richard, doesn't that make syria all the more important, you know, golan heights took mortar fire from syria, israel really doesn't want to get involved. you know, spread itself thin in syria, and i think that's why international action on syria is so important right now. >> it's one of the fault lines in the middle east. i think if you're an israeli, it's not the one at the moment that keeps you up at night the most. >> right. >> i still think the palestinian is the closest. then you've got egypt which is the anchor of israel's security. and i think actually the israelis are most worried about jordan. the israelis are not central to the dynamic in syria. syria which began as a civil war and spread into the proxy has the potential to become a regional war. just when the thought the middle east can get worse, it can. >> what's your assessment of pretty much the fact th
will prepare, considering, no, potentially success of the operation against the facility in syria. and that this may hold iran's restraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are in really concerned with situation, and let me add that people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so, there are two things which must change, diplomacy and inspections. first diplomacy. p5+1 has served as united front. five plus one means to me united nations, security council related, global responsibility to europeans like to prefer 3+3, which means the european union is the main player. i'm a little nervous about if you're in europe you had better say three plus the otherwise you will not be served dinner. [laughter] but i think it is, five plus one of course is important to keep on. but i think u.s. should not do, u.s. does not hide inside this group. u.s. has now time to take responsibility. and to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now, they give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution of 1979. should also the i
to of been coed in northwestern syria. governmentorces and rebels have been fighti there for weeks. on thursy, rebstoed several army checkpoints. they appear to haveapred these government soldiers. in the video, rebels yell, "you are assad's dogs" at their captives, and then they prayed. after tt, the fired rnd afte round, killing at least 10 of those prisoners. the united nations is trying to verify the video and says the killings probably constituted a war crime and those responsible should be punished. >> it looks very likely that this is a war crime, another one. unfortunately, this uld be the latest in a stream of documented executions byppitn wl as government forces and its affiliated with them. >> there's been heavy fighting with government planes bombing rebel positions near the turkish border awe as in the capital damasc. >> the conflict between the government and rebels in syria has met mer for millions of people. >> the united nations says it is having trouble collecting money pledged to help alleviate their plight. the itatnsays member states have promised some 270 million euros
of the entire region. syria, and the disorder spills across the neighborhood. joining us again, and fbi supervisory agent. you see that as late? >> what is happening in syria, you have to look at it from a few different perspectives. first you have the syrian people who want freedom from bashar al-assad's regime. then you have regional conflict that is going on. this is between iran and turkey. turkey is supporting the iranian people and iran is supporting the regime. you also have to look at it on a different level. where you have russia and china also involved on global levels with the syrian conflict. it is becoming a war of shadows and a war of different phones. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this
street gorm, that they are coming back everywhere in iraq, in afghanistan, in syria. they're all over the place. so it interferes with the president's narrative. we got bin laden, al qaeda's on the run, therefore, i am a great command in chief. the fact is everything's unraveling in the missed east. >> greta: straight ahead, not just senator mccain, tonight, senator lindy graham firing back. we are here to talk about the heated battle, next. and the real war on women. some women say they are censored by facebook. who are they? allen west, fighting a tough election battle. hew he just got big-name backup. years ago, my doctor told me to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i heard this news about a multivitamin study looking at long-term health benefits for men over 50. the one they used in that study... centrum silver. that's what i take. my doctor! he knows his stuff. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how
. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this has been going back for centuries. how we engage with that? remapped welcome of, the problem that has been happening today in syria, there is no one to fill the vacuum of bashar al-assad's falling. the new coalition of the opposition -- the syrian opposition, they get together and they elected a leader. that leadership is not a leadership that has been outside syria for 20 years. it is for people who actually were in syria until recently. jenna: there are questions about that leadership and whether it is genuine or whether or not it is the second in command, the muslim brotherhood member is someone that should be looked at again. thomas friedman makes this argument today th
suddenly it turned into the epicenter of syria's civil war. armed opposition gunmen against the syrian military machine. after months of ferocious fighting, the syrian army did manage to take back babr amr, but at terrible cost. even now only 5% of the residents have returned and the fight has just moved down the road. but to get to it, we had to take a surreal trip through a fully functioning business district crowded with shoppers and students then down a street. the next front line was marked by tanks and syrian soldiers. a young captain who wanted to be known only as omar offered to show us around. look at this. wow. months of fighting have shattered this part of the old city. >> this street, snipers. >> reporter: now? >> no. >> reporter: omar gestured to a curtain hung in an alley to block the snipers' view. even so, when soldiers pass the place, they duck. just behind these battle-scarred buildings rebel fighters are still in control. we climbed inside to try and have a look. there's not a lot moving out there. we might be able to see more from this hole but they say it's too big
continues to grow more powerful economically and politically. the civil war in syria is just one example of how beijing can exert its influence. they will also have to address domestic issues such as income disparity, environmental pollution, and corruption, to name just a few. on thursday, the party will unveil the new bureau and standing committee, the party's innermost during a power. that will complete the changing of the guard at the top until the next party congress. >> in business news, rwe has released quarterly results. germany's second largest power company has posted strong profits despite the slowdown in the eurozone. >> the biggest competitor eon shocked investors yesterday, but rwe is having no such problems. the company says it is having a good year, despite germany was a switch to more renewals and the debt crisis. in fact, rwe has raised its forecast for the year as a whole. >> for more, let's bring in our markets correspondent, who is standing by on the floor of the frankfurt stock exchange. how are investors reacting? >> the stock price of rwe is trading slightly lower
.n. wants to learn lessons from the conflict as it confronts new crises and places like syria. and we're told that it now wants to act on this report. but the war will not end until there is a proper reckoning. many say that means an independent international investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity. that would demand a kind of courage and commitment that we now know the u.n. did not show through the years of battle. >>> subsequent to that broadcast, the one has published a report and admitted that fail to protect citizens. the u.s. ambassador to the country said it was nonsense to say a small country could intimidate the u.n. workers and students in more than 20 countries across the european union took part in strikes to show their disgust at cuts and austerity measures. the largest protests were in mediterranean countries where the budget cuts will make their deepest impact. in spain, a more emotional issue. some people are being forced from their homes in a wave of defections. -- of evictions. we have this report from madrid. >> again they came, from the factories,
this period? and related to this, as we all know, there is a war -- a civil war happening in syria. iran is a wrote ally of the assad regime. how is that affecting iran yeas security calculations? -- iran's security calculations? are they going to insert that into the p-5 plus one dialogue? how will you answer the questions? >> of course the middle east has stranged. the syrian war and now this confrontation between israel and hamas that somehow brought us back to the middle east that we used to know, the israelis and the arabs going at it and egypt. but right before that iran saw its for turns decline. its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation has introduced some very, very important elements, almost sectarian element that declined -- that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of the iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this of course closed into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons this is a good time to start negotiating with iran. as its reach in the middle east
from syria where ten children are said to have been killed when a cluster bomb landed close to where they were playing. it's not the first alleged use of cluster units by the regime of president bashar al assad. it may be one of the most appalling. >> reporter: these disturbing images show what happens after a children's playground is hit, according to activist, by a cluster bomb. refugees with nowhere else to hide, apparently hit by a single deadly device dropped by a jet. some cluster bombs released smaller explosives to cause maximum devastation against softer targets. what do these children have to do with anything, yells one man? at least ten children killed, according to activist, who said they found the remains of the bomb around the tiny village of deir al assafir. cnn can't verify his pictures or claim that cluster bombs were used. but activist images from the scenes show cluster munitions. but activists say civilians have been hit before when the regime has responded to key rebel successes like at this important air base not far away. >> there is no logic at all attacking s
on the part of anybody, no international organization should listen to any arguments about going into syria or supporting the rebels in syria, in your judgment. >> in the syrian interest story -- first of all, we've got to get our intelligence correct. we don't know exactly what's happened in syria and i don't think we should fight a war on that. as to international organizations, it would be a good idea for us to join one. we are the only nation that has resisted the united nations . >> i only do this because we have a time clock here. great to see you. >> four parts. oliver stone always has an interesting take. >> unboring. >> yes, unboring. it's true. >>> instagram is kachanging the way that we see the world. we'll ask kevin systrom how his photo sharing site ended up [ libe ] le dnkrae ic oha lonn wer. eat moaue sghti ecic evs smeos n usac esi. th emesttso arow douan gw ouenelac w qteuris, lyews urxpur aayhath c dtoou 'sui aesn ard. dti romnd th iserome beusitel tstngen e am. romnd tt usit erti iru. yofe le erisomhi th y'rdog toelsagud ait the idroon d beevit dog go j. >>> there's an
your allies to make a bolder move in syria? guest: the u.s. is already doing something. i think the rest of u.s. allies, turkey, they're afraid of getting involved in this conflict. the only pressure, i think, the most active countries right now are probably qatar and saudi arabia, which we believe are supplying arms to the free syrian army, to the rebels. the u.s. and turkey are actually doing some things, they have special forces along the border who are reportedly vetting to whom those arms get delivered so they don't get delivered into the most fundamentalist gee haw dee forces. i think it's unclear exactly what the status of that is right now. yfl that allies as it happened in libya and england sort of really took the bull by the horns and pulled the u.s. into action there. it doesn't seem like that is the case in syria. i think there's a fear that it could inflame the region and i think there's a degree of caution. host: benjamin pauker is senior editor of "foreign policy magazine." we'll get to your calls in a minute. could there be foreign policy fallout in the benghazi
not have the divisions we are facing in syria. i so far there are issues that they are facing but i think we should have hope and faith and i think with the political settlement this should provide a ground for hope in the future. thank you. >> thank you. greg. >> i would like to echo dan in thanking you all for coming out on this very dreary day especially after a holiday for i'm sure many of you. and thanks to you as well for staying up a little late and giving us his great insight. as all of us know, the united states has just been through a presidential election. president barack obama was reelected. and the obama administration had a number of i think foreign policy and counter terrorism successes during the first administration obviously osama bin laden was killed in the special operations raid. president obama has overseen the drawdown of troops in iraq as well as in afghanistan. and yet i think one of the most lasting legacies from the first term of the obama administration may well be what u.s. officials term the yemen model. this is sort of how it is that the u.s. is going to fi
displayed in the face of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engage with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they are not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are goin
, but neither do i see it as very helpful in pressing russia on issues like iran or their conduct towards syria. russian opposition level leaders, however, and russian civil society, and the russian press, what free press remains in russia today really support this legislation. and i think what this legislation intends is sort of a mutually beneficial relationship with russia based on a rule of law. based on human rights. that's the hope. it includes the sergei magnitsky legislation that came out of the foreign affairs committee of which i am an original co-sponsor, and i do think we owe a debt of gratitude to chairman ros-lehtinen for her determination to have that provision in the legislation. and i think if we reflect on the words of the russian opposition in their parliament, one said recently, this provision is very pro-russian. it helps defend us in russia from criminals. it helps defend us from criminals who kill our citizens, who steal our money, and hide it abroad. and that's the point. that's what we are trying to do with that provision. and this bill liberalizing trade while at the s
, syria, the islamic republic of iran and the united states of america. well, harold coe says, what a disgrace. how can the united states be a world leader on women's rights and not sign this treaty? well, let's take a look. what would radification mean? we don't have to guess what ratification means. the american bar association has written a book-length report, 200 pages, explaining exactly what american compliance would mean. the aba report is based on the work of the u.n. monitoring committees. they go to the countries when they ratify the treaty. so when they went to britain or australia or canada, they wrote a report. what were they telling these countries to do, how would you follow the treaty? well, the aba report opposes thousands of questions, all of them potential lawsuits. the aba claims, first of all, it's not about equality under the law, it's about de facto equality; that is, equality of result, statistical equality. the aba states gender quotas are not voluntary, it creates an obligation for a quota system. so i'm just going to run through a few of these questions fr
in just a few minutes time for more on that vote. the u.s. state department has con determined syria for launching another assault on its people. the communication shutdown comes as fighting forced today h damascus airport to close thursday night. is now the time for the international community to adopt a tougher stance this we're joined by madeleine albright, former u.s. secretary of state. madame secretary, thanks very much for joining us. >> good to be with you. thank you. >> we'd like to know straight away whether it's time now for the international community and especially the u.s. toed a don't a tou to adopt a tough every stance with regard to syria. >> i'm sure the international community and the united states are taking -- paying very close attention to what is going on and they have been taking pretty tough instances in terms of making clear support for this coalition of the rebel groups and also in terms of looking at what turkey needs and generally how to make clear that the international community believes that saddam hussein's -- sorry, that bashir assad's time is over.
detected on his clothing. >>> activists in syria say dozen of people were wounded when they bombed an to live press factory. rebel controlled town near the turkish border was also attacked from the air. the facility included refugee camp there. syrian rebels meantime reportedly shot down a government helicopter today. >> bret: north carolina doesn't get the joke. if you did not shop on black friday, alert the media. we'll explain in the grapevin grapevine. >> bret: now fresh pickings from the political grapevine. cnn reports every american went shopping over black friday weekend. really. almost every one of you. the headline on the website reads 247 million shoppers visited stores and websites black friday weekend. "weekly standard" notes the numbers are suspicious taking away those too young to shop. so it would mean for the statistics to be believed shoppers would include 4.4 million people aged 75 to 79. 3 million age 80 to 84. 2 million that were 85 to 89. nearly 1 million between 90 and 94. 300,000 were 95 and older. the numbers include those who just visited websites. which s
to your broader question republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the newseum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more involvement and there are a lot of big issues he has a huge influence on because of his experience, respect and personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on but two or three have said they're putting holds on a nomination. no bell laureate economists nominated for the federal reserve who was finally withdrew his name after a year of waiting because he was not going to be -- >> consumer. >> and the consumer protection service agency, elizabeth warren's former agency so you have people all over the place, judges -- >> ambassadors. >> when lindsey graham mentioned yesterday was john boughten and that was, okay, a warning because john was not confirmed for u.n. ambassador then was a recess appointee. no way the president will nominate a secretary of state as a recess appointee. you cannot with credible lead diplomacy over
, especially given recent evidence that their shipments to syria and elsewhere? >> with respect to north korea -- they would have to demonstrate a series of meeting their data goal of denuclearization. we have engaged with the north normal basand is. we have not seen the steps. we have laid out what they need to do in terms of that kind of demonstration of seriousness with respect to denuclearization. have not seen that from them. there is an interesting question about burma. and the united states and embrace ofbama's their reform efforts and support for it. in no other way that you can imagines is an entry by berman into the international community is what comes of that and the opportunity that it provides. economically. that is an important focus of the burmese leadership. the economic prospects and promises of their coming into the international community and supported by the u.s. that is a path that if the north koreans would address the nuclear issue, that would be available to them. we have said that from the outset. it is an important example for them to contemplate. it is a regime that
sending missile parts to syria. we've talked about the relationship between north korea and the middle east before. this is the first we've heard of this and this happened a couple of months ago. what do you make of it, what is the involvement we need to watch. >> this is a continuation of a trend because the north koreans have been not only selling missiles but nuclear reactors. the reactor destroyed in 2007, that was a north korean reactor. iran paid for it. the united states has not been paying enough attention to north korean proliferation. jenna: there is so much to watch, gordon how do you prioritize. >> that is the real problem, the crises is come one right after the other. it will be very difficult for the administration or even a bunch of countries to be able to deal with this because there is too much happening all at once. jenna: it certainly feels that way. you give us a lot of thins to think about. it's good to have you on set. thank you. appreciate it very much. jon: a couple of icons of the american lunch box could be no more. we might be seeing the last of the twinninge
has taken against syria have that actually contribute any money to the humanitarian crisis that now exist in syria? >> i think occupation from russia and china have been very small. i will have to write to the honorable lady with details about the. they are not so large that have been committed in my mind, let us put it that way. we will encourage, i have encouraged before russia to make a contribution to those u.n. funds, but the biggest contribution, the biggest occupation comes from the states emphatically from the european union, third from the united kingdom. and, of course, we are also contributing the european union money. so the backing for these things is very heavily western as things stand. >> i know the foreign secretary said he didn't want to debate about the portion it or proportion. but while he is right to condemn militant rocket attacks would not also condemn the loss of innocent lives, particularly children? and with respect to both the u.n., is he out to be convinced that by taking the stance of the u.n. come uk government is to be taken, he doesn't risk undermini
for a moment in conclusion about the fact that there are various conflicts going on around the world, in syria we have seen 40,000 killed, i don't know how many, 100,000, 200,000, who have been wounded, many of them innocent women and children because of the ferocity and barbaric conduct of this conflict. i don't know how many people today in china are subject to infanticide because there is not a birth certificate available and we know that that practice not only in china but in other parts of the world, a lot of it in asia, go on. we live in a very troubled and tush leapt world. not only -- turbulent world. not only the normal situation, there are people who are born with disabilities from time to time. i have had the honor of knowing children as all of us have, and there are no more loving and caring people in our world than children and disabilities who have disabilities. but there is going to be a lot more because of the conflicts that are going on in various places in the world. they might deserve our special attention because they are living in countries that will have a lot less of the
. look at the inauction of the united states in the regard to syria. >> gretchen: it would be interesting to look at the votes. maybe we could ask the brown room. i bet she has the votes. >> brian: don't say brain room do this. and go on line and make the request like everybody else. none of the short cuts. >> gretchen: we should say that the brain room are the intelligent people who work here in fox news and do research. >> brian: you can expedite the request. >> steve: hope they're watching our channel. >> gretchen: in the meantime yasser arafat poisoned. palestinian authorities think so . so why you were sleepping they open up the grave and took samples of his remain under the cover of few sheets. there is persistant speculation in the last eight years that israel poisoned the 75 year old leadership . israel denies the claim. spoonful of medicine washed down by grapefruit juice could kill you . the list is growing from 17 to 43. on it lipitor. the problem chemical in grapefruit that messes up how your body breaks down drugs. it could basically cause a drug overdose. >> record powerball
considering potential success of the operation against the facility in syria. and this will all remove iran's constraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are either -- really concerned with the situation. let me add people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so there are two things which must change. diplomacy and the inspections. first diplomacy. five plus one has served the purpose of the it united front. five plus one mean to me united nations security council related global responsibility, europeans like to prefer three plus three which means the european union is the major player. i'm nervous about that, if you are europe you had better say three plus three otherwise you will not be served your dinner. five plus one, of course, it is important to keep on. i think u.s. should not do what it has done, hide inside this group. u.s. has now tried to take responsibility. to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now to sort of give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution 1979? should the iranians try to fo
in on some of the same elements of the bar gain. jon: let's turn our attention to syria. the bloodshed goes on there, some would say that it has been, i mean, that world attention has been focused on what's been going on between hamas and the israelis, maybe the egyptian protests while the syrians continue to kill their own people with the support of iran. what do you think? >> yeah, i mean, look, you know, it's coming up now on two years since relatively peaceful demonstrations turned into, essentially, a civil war. and the reality is there has been so much blood that has been spilled, that it's going to negate the possibility of a negotiated settlement between the assads and the opposition and, tragically, not enough blood has been spilled in order to prompt a divided international community, and the administration is very warily -- i would argue rightly, frankly -- about getting dragged into an open-ended military intervention ford to topple the assads. maybe there's a few more things we can do. arming some of the rebels that we vet, maybe considering up a sort of passive no-fly zone wit
it be in the middle east which you read about everyday, whether it be syria, whether it be iran, pakistan. the sunni-shia fault lines in the middle east, where there be out in the pacific in china. we look at what is going on with the islands within the pacific, korea and 29-year-old leader in charge of korea. what is he going to do in the future? we have narcoterrorism and transnational narco-terrorism. what does that mean to the future and security of our country? i don't know. these are questions we have to take a look at and these are questions that we have to be prepared to operate in. the other thing that i have learned frankly the hard way over the last several years is that you also have what i call opportunists, who will try to take advantage of this instability in destabilizing influence and nascent governments are failing governments and these opportunists may be unpredictable. i always use iraq as an example. there are lots of opportunists in iraq, iran, turkey, saudi arabia and nonstate actors all opportunists trying to take advantage of the situation. how does that project itself aroun
suspect we will get to is syria. . . hour. [no audio] >> should a side lose control in syria or hezbollah try to obtain them. i can't, and you guys are the experts, you i can't remember a time of more moving parts in the middle east puzzle than right now on this day, so much is now, and they are all, of course, interconnected. hamas is testing israel. israel is testing egypt. there's more uncertainty than ever about syria, its relationship with iran, whether it can hold lebanon together, what is hezbollah doing now that its backers are in their own fights inside syria. the evolving role of qatar and saudi arabia, and turkey playing a role. it's enormous. of anything at the security conference, this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i'm reminded of bob dylan's favorite song, "along the watchtower," and that should be our anthem this morning. there must be a way out of here so let's aim for some relief and less confusion, and i want to propose the following format just for the beginning of this panel, and then i think i want to open it up to a lot of questions from the floor
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)